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Board Meeting Minutes, September 18, 2018

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Commissioners’ Meeting

William F. Hutson called the meeting to order at 9:30 a.m. with Adam Friedrick and Patricia G. Geissman present. The meeting opened with the Pledge of Allegiance and a prayer.

The minutes of the September 11, 2018, were emailed in advance. Mr. Friedrick moved to approve the minutes; Mrs. Geissman seconded the motion. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE.

Commissioner Hutson presented and reviewed a resolution approving the petition for the Expedited 2 annexation of one parcel of land totaling 31.9424 acres known as being part of Lafayette Township to the City of Medina, Medina County, Ohio. The commissioners’ job is to review the annexation; no public hearing is required. Mr. Hutson noted that petition was filed on August 15, 2018 and the Commissioners are in their timeframe for rendering a decision. The Commissioners had reviewed the checklist of submission requirements and had determined that the application and attachments were in order. Under the annexation law, this will not result in the area being annexed to be detached from Lafayette Township. He opened the floor for comments.

Ted Lesiak, agent for the petitioner, stated that he was in attendance for the purpose of answering any questions the Board had. Greg Huber was in attendance representing the City of Medina. Mr. Huber stated that it had been a pleasure to work with everybody on this project. The mayor and City Council are supportive of this annexation request; it is the kind of economic development that benefits the city and the county. He stated that he appreciated the Commissioners’ consideration of this request.

Mr. Hutson stated that Lafayette Township has not filed any objections to the petition and the City of Medina has consented.

Mr. Friedrick moved to approve the resolution; the motion was seconded by Mrs. Geissman. There was no discussion. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE.

Highway Engineer Administrative Assistant Doug King presented and reviewed a resolution approving Change Order No. 1 to the contract between Aeromark, Inc. and the Medina County Commissioners for the installation of pavement markings on various Medina County Roads (MED0CRPM-FY2019). Mr. Friedrick moved to approve the resolution; Mrs. Geissman seconded the motion. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE.

The commissioners reviewed the permits issued August 30-September 12, 2018.

Finance Director Mike Pataky presented and reviewed the following resolutions: (1) amending the Annual Appropriation Resolution; (2) authorizing the filing of applications with the Ohio Department of Transportation for FY 2019; (3) executing a lease standstill agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture; (4) allowing expenses of the county engineer; and (5) allowing expenses of county officials. Mr. Pataky requested payment of the weekly bills in the amount of $1,474,538.60. Mr. Friedrick moved to approve the five resolutions and to pay the bills; Mrs. Geissman seconded the motion. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE.

Human Resources Director Holly Muren presented and reviewed the following resolutions: (1) approving personnel changes for the employees under the jurisdiction of the Medina County commissioners; and (2) amending the Table of Organization for the Medina County Building Department. Mr. Friedrick moved to approve the two resolutions; Mrs. Geissman seconded the motion. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE.

Sanitary Engineer Amy Lyon-Galvin presented and reviewed the following resolutions: (1) authorizing the sanitary engineers office to enter into an agreement with the Medina Township trustees for the operation and maintenance of county owned fire hydrants; (2) awarding the soil scientist service contract for the 2018 Home Sewage System Replacement Project; and (3) authorizing the president of the Board of County Commissioners to submit an application and execute contracts to the Ohio Public Works Commission for Issue 1 funding. Mr. Friedrick moved to approve the three resolutions; Mrs. Geissman seconded the motion. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE.

Chief Building Official Chris Randles reviewed the August Monthly Report 2018 noting that they issued 384 permits for an estimated value of construction of $20,886,306; they performed 1,481 inspections which is about 64 per day. Commercial review times are currently at 12 calendar days; residential review times are 3 calendar days. They had their first public hearing on their proposed changes to the rules and regulations.

Soil and Water Conservation District Manager Jim Dieter reminded the commissioners that their Conservation Tour will be held Thursday from 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. He reported that his board elected to move forward with filling his former position as District Technician; interviews are scheduled to begin today. Mr. Dieter stated that the big tree contest is winding down and it will likely be a pin oak tree that was found in Woodlawn Cemetery in Lodi. Mr. Dieter reported a sustainable salt workshop was recently held and was well-attended by over 100 people; a second one will be held in the near future in Amherst. Their Annual Meeting will be held October 24. He also noted that they currently have their fish sale going on.

Commissioner Hutson presented and reviewed a resolution proclaiming October 2018 as “Everybody Works” Month. Kathy Breitenbacher of Economic Development stated that Medina County has a number of alternative populations that need some help to get to work. There are terrific organizations that are working with those folks. They want to educate those companies and give them an opportunity to get then into workforce, as workforce is the number one issue in our community. They will be doing education and social media all month and an event will be held at MCUC to educate companies that want to learn how to work with these populations. Mr. Friedrick moved
to approve the resolution; Mrs. Geissman seconded the motion. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE.

Mr. Friedrick moved to go into Executive Session following the Discussion Session to discuss imminent litigation; Mrs. Geissman seconded the motion. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE.

Public Comment

Steve Viny, the CEO of Envision Holdings based in Cleveland, Ohio, distributed a slide from a presentation given by Bill Moore, President of Moore and Associates. Mr. Viny stated that Bill is the leading expert on recycled paper markets in America and provided an industry update at SWANA Wastecon last month in Nashville. Wastecon is one of the waste industry’s largest events of the year. The presentation reviews the rising effects of e-commerce on recycling and in 2017, the U.S. used more corrugated boxes than ever before. The presentation showed that due to increased online retail sales, home direct box shipments increased while commercial and brick and mortar store box shipments decreased. Mr. Viny stated that while the U.S. used more cardboard boxes than ever before (1.5 million tons) and while recycling collection infrastructure remained relatively unchanged, the U.S. recovered 300,000 less tons of cardboard than in the prior year. Cardboard production went up and recycling went down in 2017. Mr. Viny stated that Bill Moore explained it as this: Commercial recycling at the place of business is more efficient than residential recycling. He stated that it’s because commercial recycling is profit motivated. Commercial businesses such as big box retail stores recycle cardboard on site because it simultaneously reduces disposal costs and generates income from commodity sales. It’s a double win for commercial businesses. That is why grocery stores and retail establishments often have their own baler on site. Residential recycling however, does not have financial motivation. In fact, residential recycling in almost all cases comes at an increased cost over disposal only. That is largely because the cost for separate residential recycling collection and processing is costly and exceeds the commodity value. Educating the public as to what is or is not recyclable is a herculean effort which has resulted in single stream recycling and drop off contamination rates ranging from 20% to 50%. Mr. Viny stated that what Bill Moore’s slide and speech pointed out was that the commercial sector is far more efficient as recyclers than the residential sector. He noted that the commissioners have made a motion to accept an RFQ response from Rumpke which offers commercial only recycling at the CPF and offers no single family residential recycling. The Rumpke response will increase the cost for disposal to the homeowner by about $10/ton, yet will not provide them with any recycling service. The commercial sector already has an economic incentive to recycle in the normal course of their business so why do the commissioners approve a contract that forces Medina residents to pay more for a system that doesn’t even process their recyclables? It is designed to only process select commercial waste. Mr. Moore proves that it is the residential recycling sector that needs help, not the commercial sector. Yet the Rumpke response offers no recycling for the single family residential units. Online retail is growing. Home Depot reports that online sales is their fastest growing sector which now rivals their brick and mortar store sales. Walmart has decided to compete with Amazon for online retail sales and Target also reports online sales growth. Bill Moore expects to see exponential growth in online retail – diverting more cardboard and packaging materials to homeowners and away from commercial establishments. Mr. Viny noted that the data presented by Bill Moore suggests that the Rumpke response is directed exclusively towards the shrinking commercial sector for recycling while offering nothing for the increasing residential sector. The Rumpke response requires an investment of public funds of about $1 million dollars, the use of a multi-million dollar publically owned building for an initial term of a decade, and an increase in tipping fees of about $17 million in current dollars all of which is subsidized in large by the residents of Medina County who’s waste and recyclable will not even be processed here. Only commercial waste within the county as well as commercial waste from outside the county which Rumpke may import will be processed here. Mr. Viny asked how this was in the best interest of the residents and homeowners. The upgraded CPF needs to serve the future needs of Medina County projected into the next decade, not its past needs. The supply chain for recycled cardboard has changed dramatically because of online retail. Bill Moore’s data proves that more cardboard will be in the residential waste stream than ever before in our nation’s history. Mr. Viny stated that if online retail is here to stay, then approval of the Rumpke RFQ response flies in direct opposition to the direction for which our industry’s expert has identified as the largest growth sector for recyclable volumes. Mr. Viny asked if the Medina County Commissioners will follow staff’s recommendation and execute a contract that costs millions of dollars to Medina County Residents for no direct benefit or do the commissioners reject the Rumpke RFQ response and select an option that recycles all of the County’s waste – both residential and commercial –so that it benefits all. Medina County residents trust elected officials to represent their interests above all others. They depend on the commissioners. Mr. Viny stated that he hopes and prays that the Medina County Commissioners make the decision that is directly in the public’s best interest.

With no further business to come before the Commissioners, the meeting recessed at 9:50 a.m.

Discussion Session

At 9:52 a.m., the Commissioners began the Discussion Session in the Commissioners’ Conference Room.

Everyone Works Proclamation

Commissioner Friedrick stated that he works in manufacturing and his company has recently raised their starting wages to $11 an hour. Carol Carter mentioned that Seville’s businesses are experiencing the same thing.

Recycling

A brief discussion occurred about online retailer distribution and the changing climate of recycling. Commissioner Geissman noted that when she is out in public, she is still hearing what a mistake commissioners have made approving a contract that does not include residential. She pointed out that these individuals need to talk to the other two commissioners about their concerns. Commissioner Hutson and Friedrick stated that they have not heard this from the public and welcomed individuals to come to them to express their concerns.

John Stricker Dedication

Commissioner Geissman stated that Steven Bastean has found a tree for the dedication. The commissioners agreed to have the tree planted before the dedication. The stone will be placed at the dedication. Commissioner Hutson suggested that the dedication occur after one of the commissioners meetings.

Miscellaneous

Mark Fredrick stated that he would like to speak. Commissioner Hutson stated that he should sign up for public comment to present. Mark Fredrick stated that he was going to talk about the annexation and recycling. Commissioner Hutson noted that the annexation was already completed. Mr. Fredrick mentioned that he donated or sold 26 acres into that and it is his property. He went along with this annexation because it is good for the county and provides jobs through the commercial Rivago project. Mr. Fredrick stated that this will create a lot of cardboard and he is glad to see recycling on the table again, but he wants to see residential in the contract not just commercial because there is only one Earth. Commissioner Hutson stated that Mr. Friedrick could sign up for public comment next week.

At 9:52 a.m., the Commissioners began the Discussion Session in the Commissioners’ Conference Room.

Executive Session

At 10:00 a.m., the Commissioners went into the Executive Session that had been voted on earlier. The Executive Session ended at 10:10 a.m.

Adjournment

There being no further business, Mr. Friedrick moved to adjourn the meeting; the motion was seconded by Mrs. Geissman. Roll call showed all commissioners voting AYE. The meeting ended at 10:10 a.m.

RESOLUTIONS PASSED SEPTEMBER 18, 2018

  • 18-0745 Resolution proclaiming October 2018 as “Everybody Works” Month
  • 18-0746 Allowing claims and authorizing issuance upon the treasurer in settlement of such list of claims
  • 18-0747 Approving change order no. 1 to the contract between Aeromark, Inc. and the Medina County Commissioners for the installation of pavement markings on various Medina County roads (MED-CRPMFY2019)
  • 18-0748 Amending the 2018 Appropriations Resolution by transferring appropriations
  • 18-0749 Authorizing the filing of applications with the Ohio Department of Transportation for FY 2019
  • 18-0750 Executing a lease standstill agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • 18-0751 Allowing expenses of the county engineer
  • 18-0752 Allowing expenses of county officials
  • 18-0753 Approving personnel changes for the employees under the jurisdiction of the Medina County Commissioners
  • 18-0754 Amending the Table of Organization for the Medina County Building Department
  • 18-0755 Authorizing the sanitary engineers office to enter into an agreement with the Medina Township trustees for the operation and maintenance of county owned fire hydrants
  • 18-0756 Awarding the soil scientist service contract for the 2018 Home Sewage System Replacement Project
  • 18-0757 Authorizing the president of the Board of County Commissioners to submit applications and execute contracts to the Ohio Public Works Commission for Issue 1 funding
  • 18-0758 Approving the petition for the Expedited Type 2 annexation of 31.9424 acres of land known as being part of Lafayette Township to the City of Medina, Medina County, Ohio

All deliberations concerning official business and formal actions by this Board of Commissioners were conducted in an open public meeting this eighteenth day of September 2018.

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